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  Total Value: $40,975.00
In 1795 the first regular coin struck for the United States was the gold half eagle. Later in the year the first ten dollar gold pieces were made. The eagle had one obverse and two reverses, all designed by Robert Scot, the Chief Engraver. The obverse showed a plump Liberty facing right wearing an oversized soft cap. It is said that the portrait was taken from a sketch by the famous portrait artist Gilbert Stuart. This Capped Bust to Right design was used until 1804. It was combined with a Small Eagle Reverse from 1795 to 1797. The reverse showed a scrawny eagle holding a wreath in its mouth. The second reverse was Heraldic Eagle Reverse. The newer reverse, used from 1797 to 1804, had mixed up heraldry in that the arrows and olive branch were held in the wrong talons. No denomination is indicated on these coins since gold was valued by its weight and fineness as it was in Europe.

Production of the gold eagle was suspended as of December 1804 on verbal orders of President Thomas Jefferson. In July 1838, two acts of Congress changed the weight and fineness standard for United States gold coins, and Robert Patterson, the Mint Director, was ordered to resume production of the eagle. Acting Mint Engraver Christian Gobrecht designed Liberty Head or Coronet eagle. There are two types of Coronet eagles, Type 1 of 1838 to 1866 and Type 2 of 1867 to 1907.

Capped Bust To Right (1795-1804); Liberty Head No Motto (1838-1866); Liberty Head With Motto (1866-1907); Indian Head (1907-1933)

 
Coin ID
Type
Date
Svc
Grade
Price
Images
 Coin Description
Gold Eagles
RC3069
$10
PCGS
AU53
$8,900
1839/8 Type '38 Liberty $10 PCGS AU53. Scarce 2-year type. Sharp detail, looks 55...More >>>
RC74643
$10
PCGS
VF35 CAC
P.O.R
1849 Eagle - 1849 $10 PCGS VF35 CAC...More >>>
RC7371010
$10
NGC
F12 CAC
$1,975
1849-O Eagle - 1849-O $10 NGC F12 CAC. This Southern branch mint circulated 1849-O Eagle shows wear in keeping with the grade, which is verified by the CAC sticker...More >>>
RC3074
$10
NGC
AU58 CAC
$6,100
1856-S Gold Eagle - 1856-S Liberty $10 NGC AU58 CAC. Lustrous slider. Conditionally scarce. Old holder...More >>>
RC3075
$10
PCGS
AU55
$5,900
1857-S Gold Eagle - 1857-S Liberty $10 PCGS AU55. Scarce, underrated SF issue. Looks 58...More >>>
RC3078
$10
NGC
VF20
$5,400
1875-CC Gold Eagle - 1875-CC Liberty $10 NGC VF20. Seldom offered in this affordable condition...More >>>
RC79294009
$10
NGC
MS61
$975
1881 $10 (1881 Gold Eagle) NGC MS61. This mint state gold eagle shimmers with bright mint luster. The coin has surface abrasion marks and scrapes, which keep...More >>>
RC78019
$10
NGC
MS61
$975

1886-S Eagle - 1886-S $10 NGC MS61. A San Francisco $10 gold coin, or eagle, struck in the early 1880's. A total of just 970,000 eagles were struck at the most...

More >>>
RC7223004
$10
NGC
MS61 CAC
$1,075
1892 $10 (1892 Eagle) NGC MS61. This 1892 Eagle is characterized by a full strike and significant mint luster. Surface abrasion, typical of the grade is seen...More >>>
RC70002
$10
NGC
MS61 CAC
$1,075
1892 Eagle - 1892 $10 NGC MS61. A $10 gold coin, or eagle, struck in the early 1880's. A total of just 970,000 eagles were struck at the most western Mint this year...More >>>
RC7238005
$10
NGC
MS61 CAC
$1,075
1892 $10 (1892 Eagle) NGC MS61. A $10 gold coin, or eagle, struck in the early 1880's. A total of just 970,000 eagles were struck at the most western...More >>>
RC7518005
$10
NGC
MS61 CAC
$1,075
1892 $10 (1892 Eagle) NGC MS61. A $10 gold coin, or eagle, struck in the early 1880's. A total of just 970,000 eagles were struck at the most...More >>>
RC78006
$10
NGC
MS61 CAC
$1,075
1893 $10 NGC MS61. Mintages of the $10 gold coins struck in Philadelphia in the 1890's fluctuate a lot. Of this issue, a total of 1,840,840 coins were produced...More >>>
RC77008
$10
NGC
MS61 CAC
$1,075
1893 $10 NGC MS61. Certified by NGC in uncirculated condition, the present piece is highly lustrous, and boldly struck...More >>>
RC78009
$10
NGC
MS61 CAC
$1,075
1894 $10 NGC MS61. Toned to a golden-green color, as commonly found for this issue. The present coin has been certified by NGC to remain in uncirculated condition...More >>>
RC76046
$10
NGC
MS61
$975
1894 $10 NGC MS61. Toned to a golden-green color, as commonly found for this issue. The present coin has been certified by NGC to remain in uncirculated condition...More >>>
RC78018
$10
NGC
MS61
$1,125

1907 Eagle - 1907 $10 Liberty NGC MS61. A coin toned to a nice, darker yellow, gold color with no distracting marks except those consistent with the grade...

More >>>
RC72091
$10
NGC
MS61
$1,125
1907 Eagle - 1907 $10 NGC MS61. Final year of this long used design, and popular as such. Highly lustrous with no distracting marks on the surfaces, these coins...More >>>
In 1795 the first regular coin struck for the United States was the gold half eagle. Later in the year the first ten dollar gold pieces were made. The eagle had one obverse and two reverses, all designed by Robert Scot, the Chief Engraver. The obverse showed a plump Liberty facing right wearing an oversized soft cap. It is said that the portrait was taken from a sketch by the famous portrait artist Gilbert Stuart. This Capped Bust to Right design was used until 1804. It was combined with a Small Eagle Reverse from 1795 to 1797. The reverse showed a scrawny eagle holding a wreath in its mouth. The second reverse was Heraldic Eagle Reverse. The newer reverse, used from 1797 to 1804, had mixed up heraldry in that the arrows and olive branch were held in the wrong talons. No denomination is indicated on these coins since gold was valued by its weight and fineness as it was in Europe.

Production of the gold eagle was suspended as of December 1804 on verbal orders of President Thomas Jefferson. In July 1838, two acts of Congress changed the weight and fineness standard for United States gold coins, and Robert Patterson, the Mint Director, was ordered to resume production of the eagle. Acting Mint Engraver Christian Gobrecht designed Liberty Head or Coronet eagle. There are two types of Coronet eagles, Type 1 of 1838 to 1866 and Type 2 of 1867 to 1907.

Capped Bust To Right (1795-1804); Liberty Head No Motto (1838-1866); Liberty Head With Motto (1866-1907); Indian Head (1907-1933)



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